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not have to go through all this fanfare to reaffirm his relationship with the israeli government. he said this is all about reaching out to the israeli public. every stock has been very carefully choreographed by the american and israeli planners. and so far, not a single flat has been put wrong by the american leader. -- not a single foot has been put run by the american leader. he has maintained that the relationship between the u.s. and israel is an unbreakable and that the relationship that has been strained in the past with mr. netanyahu is very strong, and working very well. that was the message from the press conference tonight. the body language talked about a very close working relationship, a lot of for the exchanges between the two leaders. and when they got down to business, they mention this same three issues, iran, syria, and making peace with the palestinians. except that mr. netanyahu started without -- started with iran and mr. obama ended with it. let's listen to what mr. obama had to say. >> notwithstanding our efforts and success in mobilizing the international communi
gathered outside in nicosia, but it does lead the government looking urgently for an alternative. we are following every twist and turn. the cyprian parliament has rejected this e you deal, but what are their options now -- the supreme it -- supremecypriot parliament.iot >> that is the question. there will be a lot of frantic negotiations and frantic talks going on between cyprus and brussels to try to come up with a credible alternative. tomorrow at 9:00 in the morning local time, political party leaders will convene with the president to try to come up with a credible alternative, a plan b. there has been a very clear message sent from cyprus to brussels, and it is this -- the bailout, the whole deal has had severe miscalculations. if anything comes back to a plan b, a to have to be radically different. >> i remember speaking to german officials, and they kind of shrugged off the idea that cypress, of all european countries, could cause a problem, but that is exactly what it is doing. and at exactly. this is the third smallest member of the eurozone, the third smallest economy in t
arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizona law. and today's arguments on the heels of another case that could roll back a key portion of the voting rights act of 1965. for more on today's arguments, we turn as always to marcia coyle of the "national law journal." she was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. so the outcome, marcia, of this could actually tip the federal-state balance on who gets to govern how we vote. >> that's true, gwen. the question before the justices is where do you draw the line between who has the authority to regulate elections. the election clause of the constitution actually gives authority to both. but where is the line when one crosses or goes too far than the other doe
. the next few hours will determine the future of the country, said the government spokesman. in the meantime, with the banks closed this is a country in waiting. midday, the main shopping street here almost deserted. >> it is empty. this is one of the busy high streets. it's deserted. it's unbelievable. >> at the cash machines of a troubled bank, withdrawals are limited to 260 euros a day. >> they're afraid maybe next week -- this is our [inaudible] >> in the supermarket, there's evidence of a cash economy expanding. >> we have suppliers demanding cash. not all of them but some are in a panic situation and are demanding cash payments. >> so everyone is waiting to see whether the government can strike a deal with the e.u. by the deadline of monday and save the country from bankruptcy. the challenge for cyprus and its parliament is how to raise nearly $6 billion and so qualify for a full zureo -- eurozone bailout. the problem is there is tension between cyprus and germany. only today angela merkel was warning that patience has its limits. banking would be restructured with smaller bank account
out. now the government says all banks will be closed till thursday as it negotiates the terms of this deal. gavin hewitt starts our coverage. >> hurt, anger, outrage -- that was the mood on the streets of the cypriot capital. in exchange for european bailout, small and large savers will have to pay a one-off tax. >> we are sleeping. we all come in the morning, knowing that we were significant -- >> as a nation, it has taken us 40 years to build our economy to the level it is. with done one day -- within one day, we have shot it down. we are very betrayed. >> they can do it anywhere. live in europe, europe has betrayed us. >> at one stage, the crowd was urged to march towards the presidential palace. many people believed their savings had been guaranteed. what is clear is that the bailout deal negotiated in brussels cannot be implemented here except in the face of furious opposition. will have depositors to pay -- just reducing the amounts savers and depositors will have to pay probably won't be enough. teeple are still trying to get their money out of cash machines, but there
are in a panic situation and are demanding cash payments. >> so everyone is waiting to see whether the government can strike a deal with the e.u. by the deadline of monday and save the country from bankruptcy. the challenge for cyprus and its parliament is how to raise nearly $6 billion and so qualify for a full zureo -- eurozone bailout. the problem is there is tension between cyprus and germany. only today angela merkel was warning that patience has its limits. banking would be restructured with smaller bank accounts protected but larger accounts possibly taking steep losses and there might still be a tax on savings. it was rejected once but might be applied to big deposits. every move is controversial. these bank statue were blocking the roads today. they fear restructuring the banks will lead to layoffs. >> they fear they won't have a job. what do you think will happen? >> whatever is decided here will still have to win the approval of the eurozone and the i.m.f. in order for cyprus to receive a bailout. >> and the reports coming in tonight do suggest that as part of the new plan being debite
. >> ( translated ): it is the duty of the israeli government to at least halt the activity so that we can speak of issues. and when we define our borders and their borders together, each side will know its territory in which it can do whatever it pleases. so the issue of settlement is clear. >> warner: but the president said pre-conditions for talks were counter-productive. >> we do not consider continued settlement activity to be constructive, to be appropriate, to be something that can advance the cause of peace. if the only way to even begin the conversations is that we get everything right at the outset, or at least each party is then we're never going to get to the broader issue, which is how do you actually structure a state of palestine that is a sovereign, contiguous, and provide the palestinian people dignity. >> warner: the president also met with young palestinians, many of whom have lost faith in any resolution to the decades- long conflict. back in jerusalem, before a larger crowd of similarly-young israelis the president gave the featured address of his mideast tour. while reitera
. >> and we have the stumbling blocks in the deal to sequester the government spending cuts but first the look at how the overseas markets fair fared today. >>> on wall street, more red than green in the stock market and some losses in the oil patch as well. >> that's where we begin our market outlook tonight. the company's ceo expects negative pricing press neuer several airs. looking at the stocks, down almost 4 percent. other drillers almost got hit. neighbors and hall burton down as well. leading the s&p gainers today. jcpenney the retailer got a positive report from an analyst at oppenheimer because of the new joe fresh shot. but says pennies needs to work through its problems. >> as ttrazenika reported a big drop. and forecast continuing difficulties with competition from generic drugs. shared traded in new york were down slightly at 46.18. >> and after six year on the job, electronic arts ceo offered his resignation during the tenure. the stock dropped more than 60 percent. he said in a memo revenues will be at the low end of his earlier guidance and was accountable for it. shares were
. >> well-received by the enthusiastic young audience, it will not go well with the center-right government. againstler, so opening the creation of a palestinian state. this was an overwhelmingly pro- is really speech, barack obama logging its achievements, condemning the enemies, but the message came in the middle. there has to be peace in the region and that cannot happen without the independent viable palestinian state. no israeli border big enough, no missile system, and occupation is not the answer. ironically, barack obama seemed less engaged and less preoccupied with the moribund speech process when he met palestinian leaders earlier today in ramallah. they, too, have a responsibility, the president told them, and have to be prepared to make sacrifices. this visit has largely been about barack obama reconnecting with israel and working with leaders. but he has also shown he is prepared to invest more time and effort into achieving be unachievable. achieving be unachievable. >> there was one phrase that barack obama used again and again, telling israeli leaders the same phrase, tellin
the facts before me, that we know the syrian government has the capacity to carry out chemical weapon attacks. we know that there are those in the syrian government who have expressed a willingness to use chemical weapons if necessary to protect themselves. i am deeply skeptical of any claim that in fact it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. the broader point is, is that once we establish the facts, i have made clear that the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. >> warner: both leaders spoke extensively about iran and about the different timetables the countries are on for possible military action to prevent an iranian nuclear weapon. mr. obama said he thinks there is still time for diplomacy but added: >> each country has to make its own decisions when it comes to the awesome decision to engage in any kind of military action. and israel is differently situated than the united states, and i would not expect that the prime minister would make a decision about his country's security and defer that to any other country, any more than the united states would defer our de
by the intelligence agencies of governments who did not support my decision to remove saddam and it is true that much of the intelligence turned out to be wrong. >> warner: a report released this month put the cost of iraq's reconstruction at more than $60 billion so far. that on top of 1.7 trillion in estimated war costs according to a recent study by brown university. today some baghdad residents spoke of little progress and expressed anger at the united states. >> the americans did not do anything when they came to iraq. they granted freedom to iraq? what freedom are they talking about? >> warner: in washington, president obama issued a statement marking the anniversary saying he joined in paying tribute to all who served and sacrificed in one of our nation's longest wars. earlier i spoke to jane arraf a reporter earlier, i spoke to jane arraf, a reporter for al-jazeera english and the christian science monitor, about today's violence in baghdad and life in post-war iraq. welcome jane. what is known about who or what's behind today's car bombings and suicide attacks? >> well, the finger, judy, is
the syrian government has the capacity to carry out chemical weapon attacks. we know that there are those there the syrian government who have compressed a willingness to use-- expressed a willingness to use chemical weapons if necessary, to protect themselves. i am deeply skeptical of any claim that in fact it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. everybody who knows the facts of the chemical weapon stockpiles inside of syria as well as the syrian government's capabilities i think would question those claims, but i know that they're floating out there right now. the broader point is that once we establish the facts, i have made clear that the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. >> rose: joining me from washington, michigan congressman mike rogers, he is the chairman of the house intelligence committee. i am pleased to have him on this program. welcome. >> charlie, thanks for having me. >> rose: what is it that caused you to say, you know, there's a probability? >> well, there is a growing body of reporting for really about 18 months about what we believe the syrian intent
. the government feared it might not win a majority for the bailout. without extra funding, cyprus faces bankruptcy. the british community around -- the british community, around 60,000, is also assessing its losses. cypriot friends are in shock. >> they felt as though someone had put their hand in their pocket and taken their money without letting them know what was going on. >> others speak of a breach of trust. >> people are going to take their money out of the eurozone in general the guys they don't trust them -- because they don't trust them. >> they have been reducing the amount -- they have been discussing reduce the amount that small savers will have to pay. the crisis is threatening the eurozone. >> reports coming in from europe suggest the eu may have changed the deal, to allow people with deposits of less than 100,000 euros to get off that tax. i spoke a short time ago with former u.s. treasury secretary tim -- larry suckers -- i spoke a short time ago with former u.s. treasury secretary larry summers. >> it changed the world. sarah gave a was a small place -- sarajevo was a small place.
twice the height of the plant's seawall. it's now known that tepco had been warned by a government committee of scientists in 2009 that its tsunami defenses were inadequate. the company says it was still reviewing the matter when the disaster happened. now, the tsunami flooded the nuclear plant. >> (translated): the port area was trashed. i felt something incredible had happened. >> narrator: this man is a senior nuclear engineer who still works at the plant. >> (translated): cars had been left everywhere by the wave. buildings and 5,000-ton fuel tanks were sucked out to sea. i watched them slowly sinking. >> narrator: most of the backup diesel generators needed to power the cooling systems were located in basements. they were destroyed by the tsunami waters, meaning the workers had no way of keeping the nuclear fuel from melting. >> (translated): when i heard the diesel generators were lost, i couldn't square that with reality. i was stunned. >> narrator: this is the frantically scribbled log the engineers kept on a whiteboard in the control room as the nuclear plant slid towards
billion bailout package from the government at the height of the financial crisis. now he is suing the federal government alleging they mistreated stockholders in the course of the bailout. his new book "the a.i.g. story" tells the story of the company's dramatic history. in the interest of full disclosure, c.d. starr foundation was an underwriter of this program in the past and i'm pleased to have hank greenberg back at this table, welcome. >> thank you. the. >> rose: why this book >> several reasons. i thought the facts first of all -- the facts had to come out what really happened. the so-called accounting scandal turned out to be nothing. if after enron boards became more critical of almost anything that everybody was doing but more importantly i wanted the 92 people that helped build a.i.g. and all the things they did to make it the greatest insurance company in history, that story had to be told on their behalf as well. >> rose: this book is how he be built -- >> rose: i joined at the end of '60, a.i.g. went public in the late '60s. >> rose: ran a.i.g. in new york and c.e.o.
, but it is what it is. at the heart of it is ending too big to fail, giving the government new tools to resolve large financial institutions when they feel in a way it will not hurt taxpayers and not subject them to risk. well, it forced losses on the shareholders and creditors of the large financial institutions, which is where they belong. it also requires the federal reserve board to have much tougher prudential standards, so higher capital, more stable liquidity, less reliance on short-term debt. those are the types of things that were problems during the crisis and the fed has been mandated to have better regulation to prevent banks from getting in trouble to begin with. the volcker rule, too, a key part, it was designed to prohibit proprietary trading by those institutions in the government safety net. if you're a bank holding company that has an insured bank that has fdic-backed deposits or access to the federal reserves discount window, you have a lot of government support provided to traditional banks. so volcker is really about customer service. your banking model should be serving cu
before the supreme court says the federal government will not recognize in the many programs a same-sex marriage that is recognized by the state. in terms of estate tax and benefits, some 1,000 programs. if a couple is legally married in the eyes of its is state, it is not married in the eyes of the federal government. that is a new policy for the federal government. prop 8 only speaks to california and bans same-sex marriage in california. >> scott: vik, they are different, but intersect. we will learn about what the justices feel about doma on tuesday when they ask questions about prop 8. what are the legal even tantangs here? >> jane is correct. the supreme court could strike one down without affecting the other. their way is to do that. both at the procedural level and substantive lae substantive level, there are comm commonalities. how do we defend a statute, the president and attorney general and governor, decline to defend? in both of these, the elected executive officials declined. that is a common question. on marriage, at base, the cases ask a fundamental question of prote
or 13 years they're spending -- their spending by the government's gone berserk. it's almost tripled since the year 2000. while government revenues went up nicely in cyprus, the government spended and spent some more and we've seen that in southern europe and elsewhere and now the piper has to be paid . >> mr. forbes, given the differences you've pointed out between the economies and the attitudes of germans and german favors and those of southern europeans, do you think it would be bet father cyprus had just left the -- would be better if cyprus had just left the euro one right now? >> there's no reason why it couldn't fit together if these things were treated as a credit die sis from the very beginning -- crisis from the very beginning. in my country, for example, it won't happen, but let's say the state of illinois, which is an economic disaster disically, defaulted on its bonds, it wouldn't leave the dollar zone, it's a credit problem. that's what this should have been treated as in the beginning. figure out how you deal with the banks that are in trouble, stop piling on new taxe
for financial bailout. but early today the cyprusian government is sparking concern throughout the region. joining me is andrew ross sorkin of the "new york times" and francesco guerrera for financil economic. simon i'll win good you. what's going on. >> well the explanation part is that a number of cyprian banks gambled and lost in a big way on greek debt. they facing big losses and these banks are big relative to the economy. the economy needs financial assistance from the outside from the european union and i'm afraid the people running the show presumably the germans in the first instance have decided greek depositors should take a hit. the way that played out at least over the weekend was all depositors would take a hit of some kind no matter how small their deposit. it sales to be now an attempt to back away from that and focus on people with deposits over 100,000 euros targeting in part russians who hold a large amounts of money, claims on those cyprian banks. >> rose: when that happened what was the talk in the financial community citing your com a couple quotes one from dennis
'll do is try to extend the banking holiday through the weekend. that's going to give the government, they hope, time to recapitalize the bank. that's a long-winded way to say pitch the bank. put a lot more money in them so they are stronger. not until tuesday because it happens to be a holiday. >> michelle, this is suzie. what do you think could happen on tuesday? there's been so much pent-up anxiety, what happens when those banks open? >> well, it all depends on what happens over the next four days. so cyprus rejeblcted the first idea and they try to raid a pension fund to come up with money to meet the requirements of the bail out from the european partners. now that all of those things have happened, they face two choices. they need to shut down some banks that are very, very weak. or they're going to have to leave the euro. that's the choice they face. and depending on which one they make, that's what's going to happen on tuesday. >> michelle, how did the banks in cyprus get so bloody. is it really traceable basically to the fact that it's a kind of "don't ask, don't tell" kind
, but maybe he wants to us think he just might. that question was never posein the u.s. government or the cia, despite very smart people theyci have there. >> rose: then they launched thele invasion, and was immediately successful.an saddam went into hiding.dd what happened in the days after that, that made, for most of us looking at it, and for most analysts-- and you included -- serious mistakes?ys >> well, i was there for that part-- this enterprise as an embedded correspondent, both in the command and on the ground.on and the expectation was-- theth americans essentially fought last war. they fought the 2003 war as if it was an extension of the 1991x war. they thought you defeat the republican guard pup go to-- you defeat kind of the conventionali forces. and then war is done, and we're finish people say there wasn't a plan. there was a plan. it was to hand over as quicklyan as possible to the iraqis themselves to take out driver, put in some new drivers into the vehicle, and let it go down the road. >> rose: that was rumsfeld's theory. >> it was also condi rice's. the institution would h
of the challenges he's facing putting together his new government and obama basically said, well, talk to me about it. look what my problems on capitol hill are, and netanyahu said, yeah, but we have more moving parts over here, parts in our country don't move at all, that's the problem. >> i had my doubts about whether or not he was going to shift netanyahu's opinion on him. i felt that from the -- remember that photototof netanyahu and obama sitting on the couch in the white house? >> the oval office. >> do you remember that? >> sure. being lectured. >> the whole body posture and so forth. but some of the video emerging from this trip is so authentic and even the words of netanyahu describing obama and what he means, what obama means to him in this relationship. a true friend. it was very authentic. >> yes, i think it was. and i think they did have, for the first time really, the kind of environment and personal contact within that environment that made this all possible, and they all both know, and certainly they know how important a good personal relationship is on an issue as complicated and
profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, malaysia. so it is not so much a risk on/risk off. if i can jump off an earlier point which is fantastic which is the expansion we see the fundamentals have not changed a lot. that allows us to be a little more flat until the end of the year. sentiment is a very powerful thing. sentiment as momentum picks up people become more confident and like stocks that can be rather strong. we are looking at that right now. so bonds are being sold to finance equities that would change the dynamic and we have to revisit our estimates. >> thanks so much. >> thank you. >>> and coming up we will get more specific and find out which stocks this week's market monitor likes. >>> more warnings
was chief negotiator with the syrian government and president and founder of the israeli institute. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table, at this time, when the president is saying some very interesting things in israel. so welcome. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: characterize this speech by the president. >> this speech was typical obama at his best, working his oratorical magic on a crowd that lapped it up. he spoke very convincingly about his commitment to israel's security and his understanding of their security dilemmas. and particularly underlined what he was going to prevent iran from getting nuclear weaponsment but then he went into a rif about peace and the necessity of peace and the possibility of peace, and why peace has to be just, even saying put yourself, you israelis put yourself in the shoes of the palestinians. and talked over the heads of the leadership of israel to say to them, you need to push your leaders to take risks at peace. >> rose: basically saying you have to make sacrifices on settlements and other issues in order to get some kind of agreeme
substantial losses to help the government raise $7.5 gill i don't know and the country's second largest bank will be shut down. the parliament rejected an earlier plan to tax all bank deposits large and small. but this new agreement sparked little optimism in nicosia, the capital. >> the decisions that were taken were harsh. it is a catastrophe. it will be a long time before things are right again. >> it's a big shame what has happened with the way things were going, what else could they do? there was no other solution. god help us all. >> warner: the bailout does prevent cyprus from falling out of the euro currency system. a prospect that alarmed financial markets last week. still, the cyprusite foreign minister don't sound relieved. >> we feel rather bitter. we feel rather that we have not been treated the same way as other partners. probably being the smallest, i don't know. but we are a resilient people. we are going to fight. >> warner: the nuzzles got a chilly reception in russia where depositors hold an estimated $26 billion in cyprus banks but in germany chancellor angela merkel prai
in the election and is now in the government said we don't need-- a second palestinian state. that isn't new thinking. and he said very pointedly, people can't be occupiers in their own land. in order, he was rejecting the ideaçó that israelis don't have the right to live anywhere they want in the entire territory. today i talked to ashwari, a palestinian very prominent, still member of the p.l.o. executive committee and she said we don't need new language and thinking we need new will and courage by the united states and palestinians were widespread in their disappointment with the trip because they felt that the president had really embraced the israeli kind of view of this conflict, and had not expressed a willingness to press for some free zone settlement. it does not mean something may not happen. but you could see that new thinking is going to come hard in this region of a very old conflict. >> margaret warner, thank you very much, joining us from amman. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": chicago's plans to shutter public schools; the growing gap on how internet access is bei
troubles in cyprus where the government is trying to come up with a plan to reorganize its banks by monday. that's the deadline set by the european union officials. if they don't, it could mean collapse of the entire banking sector. as michelle caruso-cabrera tells us, that fear is being felt on the streets. >> reporter: cyprus yet another country in europe where the devastation from the financial crisis is being felt throughout the population. throughout cyprus lines could be seen at the atms of the country's weakest bank, people desperate to take out cash because they're on the verge of failure. >> we're being treated like third-class citizens and we're very, very angry. >> reporter: how much money did you take out? >> i just took $1,000. i've been taking $1,000 every day. and personally, i'm taking this money and cash with me to the u.k. tonight. >> reporter: because? >> because we don't know what the future of our country holds. >> reporter: the reason they're using the atm? the banks have been closed nearly a week and won't open until tuesday, earliest. business owners deeply affected
not think we need to started here. >> good news, the government will not shut down, not at least until the end of september. >> i think we need to give credit to senator barbara mikulski on this. she negotiated a great deal in the senate and also the house. she has come through as a top- notch legislator. that said, bigger problems are ahead of us. >> the 8% of defense will kick in, so there will be furloughs. >> they have delayed the furloughs because of the continuing resolution. >> that is a good point because 28% of all federal hires are we talk about how much we revere and respect and admire veterans. they are the ones that will get laid off. >> the republicans are lucky that the ryan plan does not have a chance. if the american people got wind of the kind of cuts that would happen under this budget, and most people do not pay attention to this back-and-forth, but it started to happen, they would not like it at all. you can see that in all the data. >> i hate to be critical of you -- actually, i do not really. but you missed the story on the budget. the real news is the senate off
of respect for, the future solution lies in creating golden triangles with business, government, and civil society to make real commitments, to make real innovation, to make real commitments for nutritional labeling, health and wellness programs, and raise the awareness about -- for the general public about what is at stake here. >> but, as consumers drink less soda, and water is now america's favorite drink, how are you preparing for that change? >> oh, well we have -- we provide choice. we have 3,000 products, 500 brands, all across the world, and we provide choices. >> muhtar, i want to congratulate you on coca-cola for getting this award tonight for promoting women into leadership positions at your company. so you've said it makes good business sense to empower women. tell us why. >> it makes good business sense inside the company to empower women because when you are a consumer products business like ours, where 75% of your shoppers are women, you need to connect better with those shoppers through women leaders, and having a really good balance between women leaders, equitable balance
, and secondly, was he a man who could govern. governorring seemed to be an important quality here. >> definitely. there's a real sense that things have to be straightened out. there was a great feeling of drift under benedict. his mind was focused on writing his biography of jesus and being a theologian and he was somewhat aloof and removed from matters. i don't cover the vatican closely i don't have a complete handle on his papacy. you can't have a shera come in who doesn't have the whole package, projecting piety and projecting a sense of faith that will stimulate people to return to the church or reinforce the church. that's got to be essential really at least in the minds of the cart numbers. >> rose: stay with me, i wanted to bring in monsignor. >> i wanted to say something. he was latin american and the church in latin america is very important to the church and the holy sea. >> rose: because that's where the growing numbers are. >> it's not just a question of numbers, it's a question where the battle has been going on for the past 10-15 years to decide whether the faith or being a cath
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)